The Condiment Series: A Nod To Fruit Butter

Let’s first do a non-traditional method for our butter. We’re using steamed and/or boiled apples and quince that were the leftover end result of other recipes. This apple cider and this batch of apple-quince jelly gave me plenty of spiced, cooked fruit that I just couldn’t let go to waste.

Finally, at the bottom of this post I’ll throw in a second apple butter recipe I’ve made over and over again but is made the traditional way from raw apples. Both are truly delicious.

Apple-Quince Butter

About 5 cups cooked apples and quince, peeled and blended
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
3/4 cup brown sugar (packed)

Because these are already spiced and sweetened, the recipe couldn’t be more simple. You just throw them into a blender or food processor and blend until you get a smooth consistency.

Add them to the pot and add the vanilla and brown sugar. (This is to your own taste. You may want more or less so test it first.) Cover and bring to a simmer and cook for 1 hour, stirring often.

Uncover the pot and cook for another 1/2 hour or so, until the butter becomes very stiff. Unlike the recipe below, we don’t have to cook this any longer because the apples were precooked, so it doesn’t take long at all.

At this point you can enjoy the yumminess right away or process in a water bath for 10 minutes for pint jars, 15 for quarts. (See the main canning page for canning instructions.) This turned out really great. But it’s slightly different than what I usually make:

Old-Fashioned Apple Butter

(from victoriamag.com)

8 large apples (I usually use Fuji) peeled, cored, and chopped
3 cups apple cider
2 1/2 cups brown sugar (packed)
3 teaspoons ground cinnamon
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 teaspoons ground allspice
1 teaspoon ground cloves

In a large pot, boil the apples in the cider for a good 4 hours or so, or until the mixture has thickened up and apples are mushy. Let them cool a bit, then add them to a blender or food processor and blend until you get a smooth consistency.

Add them back to the pot and add the spices, vanilla and brown sugar. (This is to your own taste. You may want more or less so test it first.) Cover and bring to a simmer and cook for 2 more hours, stirring often. Uncover the pot and cook for another 1/2 hour or so, until the butter becomes very stiff.

As with the recipe above, you can eat it immediately or process in a water bath for 10 minutes for pint jars, 15 for quarts. (See the main canning page for canning instructions.) This recipe is tried and true and is perfect for first-timers. It never fails.

Fruit butter… oh yeah!